Engineering Trains in SMRT

Our Trains group employs an extensive range of specialised vehicles to maintain our rail network. Grouped under the Engineering Trains Branch (ETB), these vehicles roll out from our depots after passenger trains stand down. Below are the key workhorses of ETB which are used by our engineers when the rest of Singapore is asleep.

SMRT Track Tamping Vehicle

SMRT Track Tamping Vehicle

Used to tamp ballasts while simultaneously measuring and correcting track alignments so that they are longitudinally aligned and level. This is achieved by packing the ballast(crushed stones that forms the trackbed) underneath each sleeper so that each sleeper can support the track effectively. The packing of ballast is called tamping. Our TTVs ensure SMRT passengers have a smooth and safe ride.

Train number: TTV01, TTV02
Crew: 5 (minimum)
Weight: TTVO1: 37 tons
TTVO2: 63 tons
Speed: Limited to 18km/h self-propelled

 

Multi-function Vehicle (MFV)

Multi-function Vehicle (MFV)

A moving inspection lab, the MFV uses a rail flaw detection system to detect internal cracks within the rail in real time. The system uses roller search units with ultrasonic transducers positioned in an array of angles for thorough test coverage. Engineers aboard the MFV analyse the ultrasonic data to ensure the rails are not cracked. This vehicle also equipped with track geometry measurement system which records and check the geometry of the running rail and third rail.

Crew: 4 (minimum)
Weight: 32 tons
Speed: 18km/h self-propelled
40km/h (max speed)

 

Rail Grinding Vehicle (RGV)

Rail Grinding Vehicle (RGV)

Used to re-profile the rail heads and eliminate rail corrugation in order to reduce track stresses and to extend the service life of the rail, and ensure ride comfort. Rail grinding is applied to eliminate various types of rail defects, to achieve a rail profile that optimises wheel/rail contact and combats noise and vibration. This will also reduce service failures due to rail surfaces that are uneven.

 

Train number: RGV3, RGV5
Crew: 4 (minimum)
Weight: 118 tons
Speed: 18km/h (self-propelled), 50km/h (hauled by locomotive)

 

 

Viaduct Inspection Wagon

Viaduct Inspection Wagon

To inspect elastomer bearing mounted between the concrete grinders and columns.

Crew: 4 (minimum) + 1 (External Professional Engineer)
Weight: 36 tons
Speed: 50km/h (hauled by locomotive)

CKG Diesel Locomotives

CKG Diesel Locomotives

Our oldest diesel locomotive, introduced 29 years ago. These old locos no longer ply the North South East West Line and are used to shunt (which means to haul) passenger trains within Bishan Depot when trains go there for maintenance. Mainly utilised by Rolling Stock Workshop.

Train number: D02, D10
Crew: 2
Weight: 26 tons
Speed: 18km/h

Deli Diesel Locomotive

Deli Diesel Locomotive

Our most numerous and powerful locomotive, able to haul 240 tons. Single rail vehicle powered by its own diesel engine. Can combine with another locomotive to provide propulsion for maintenance wagons and other machinery.

Train number: D201 to 215, D216 to D219
Crew: 2
Weight: 56 tons
Speed: 50km/h

Second Generation Deli Diesel Locomotives

Second Generation Deli Diesel Locomotives

Schöma Electrical Locomotive

Schöma Electrical Locomotive

Single rail vehicle able to move by itself or combine with another to provide propulsion for maintenance wagons and other machinery. Able to move with either onboard batteries or third rail power source. It may look small but can haul over 100 tons.

Train number: EL01, EL02, EL03, EL04
Crew: 2
Weight: 34 tons
Speed: 50km/h

Tunnel Cleaning Wagon

Tunnel Cleaning Wagon

Uses high pressure water jets to clean tracks, third rail cover, mounting brackets alongside tracks and lower portion of tunnel walls.
Crew: 2
Weight: 41 tons
Speed: 50km/h (hauled by locomotive)

Heavy Crane Vehicle

Heavy Crane Vehicle

Mobile crane used to lift heavy objects of up to 3-tons.

Crew: One operator, one Rigger, one lifting supervisor
Weight: 60 tons
Speed: Limited to 18km/h

Constant improvement and renewal of our rail network

We previously put up a couple of post here here and here on the various multi-year projects SMRT is carrying out in order to renew and improve the aging network. If you didn’t have a chance to read the posts earlier, here are some excerpts about some of the projects that are going on.

 

Siemens Train at SMRT depot

1. Upgrading older trains to enhance fleet reliability

“The upgrade is more than a makeover that gives our passengers clean and brightly lit cabins with comfortable seating. When completed in 2018, the upgraded C651 Siemens trains will have new or refurbished train sub-systems such as new air conditioning, electric doors (which are more silent and reliable compared to pneumatic doors powered by compressed air on older trains), brakes and propulsion systems.”

Resignalling works

2. Re-signalling will allow us to run more trains with less signalling faults

“The new system supplied by Thales Canada is one of the most advanced train signalling systems in the world. When all the new trains arrive to our network, this will allow trains to be spaced 100 seconds apart, which is an improvement from the 120 seconds time between trains under the decades-old system. More frequent train arrivals, especially during peak hours, means less congestion at station platforms and a faster journey for passengers.”

 

SMRT Sleeper replacement

3. We have successfully replaced all 96,000 wooden sleepers on the North-South Line
“Passengers on the North-South Line enjoy a smoother and safer journey with old wooden sleepers replaced with longer lasting concrete ones. We are now working to replace 92,000 wooden sleepers on the East-West line. Works began in May 2015. We are on track to finish this by end 2016.”

 

This short two-minute video summarises the four main projects that are currently underway so that we can bring you a safer, more comfortable and more reliable journey.

Condition Monitoring with RailVision

There are two trains in our network that have these grills under the seats of the saloon car. Any guesses what is behind them? Read more

What happens during road closures?

During special events like National Day, roads are closed and bus services are diverted. What sort of work does the Buses Team have to do to ensure clear communications and smooth operations with the Bus Captains? Read on to find out more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Service Controllers

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Lim Gem Seng

Seated at the Bus Operation Control Centre (BOCC), the service controllers like Mr Lim Gem Seng have a complete overview of all bus services running at any one time. Should Bus Captains need assistance on the road, they can call back to BOCC and the service controllers are there to assist. It’s a two-way communication too as service controllers can also call the Bus Captains on the road when they receive information about roads that have been unexpectedly closed off due to accidents or other obstacles.

Route Controllers

Route Controller Sarojini

Sarojini

At the last bus stop before the diversion, Route Controllers like Sarojini inform all commuters on board about the change in bus route. This avoids surprises for commuters who may have missed the signs at the front of the bus about the diversions.

Bus Captains

Tey Tiong Siong

Tey Tiong Siong

At the interchanges, before the Bus Captains, like BC Tey Tiong Siong, head off on their route, they are reminded by their group supervisors on the road closures that they will encounter. When they are on the road, Bus Captains can also look out for the Route Controllers who are stationed at key junctions around the diverted area that will point the Bus Captain towards the correct direction.