Trains Operations Review: Our Service Commitment

In 2017, SMRT celebrates 30 years of MRT operations.

Delivering a world-class transport service that is safe, reliable and customer-centric is at the heart of what we do.

As Singapore’s iconic train operator, we carry more than two million passengers on our train network daily. Throughout our 30 years of service, we have connected communities and transformed the way people live, work and play.

As we embark on our next leg, your journey matters. We look forward to the boundless opportunities to continue serving you and delivering safe and reliable travel experiences.

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Firstly, we thank you for your support! With 162 compliments to every complaint received, your feedback goes a long way in encouraging SMRT staff. Always there to help you, our station managers and ambassadors are ever-willing to go the extra mile to make you feel safe and comfortable on our trains.

 

Feel free to tap on the many commuter service touchpoints we have across our stations, passenger service centres, platforms and trains to make your commute with us more comfortable.

Stay in touch with us through our digital platforms. Our two-way communication channels provide you with real time travel updates and a platform to give us feedback too.

At SMRT, we strive to create and provide a safe, inclusive and accessible environment for all our commuters. Here are just some initiatives we have implemented.

SMRT Trains will continue to bring you greater convenience and comfort.

Graphics: SMRT Trains Ltd. Operations Review 2017

SMRT-LTA Joint Media Conference

System-level performance checks of the new signalling system have placed SMRT in the spotlight recently. Mr Lee Ling Wee, Chief Executive Officer, SMRT Trains, updated the media at the SMRT-LTA Update on the re-signalling project today (14 July 2017). We share his remarks here.

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Good morning, members of the media.

I just have three key points to make before we proceed with the presentation.

Seeking commuters’ patience and understanding

Firstly, I would like to thank our commuters for their patience and understanding and seek their continual support as we go through this process of system renewal on the oldest MRT line in Singapore as a nation. I would like to also add that not every incident and delay on North-South and East-West Lines (NSEWL) over the past weeks was caused by the new signalling system. From time to time, we still encounter signalling faults due to the ageing legacy signalling system that is still running part of the East-West Line (EWL) from Pasir Ris to Pioneer station. For example, the incident that occurred on Wednesday morning 12 July between Jurong and Clementi station was due to a track circuit failure, and is not related to the new signalling system on the NSL and Tuas West Extension (TWE). The new signalling system is definitely superior to the legacy system by design because of the system redundancy that it offers. It is important that we get over this transition phase where we rigorously check the system during passenger service and resolve all the initial teething problems. This is a necessary process that we must undertake because the NSEWL is an operational line.

Systematic approach to address and resolve issues

Secondly, we have put in place a systematic approach to implement the new signalling system. This includes a comprehensive and progressive plan to weed out teething issues, starting with software testing and verifications in Thales software lab, followed by proof of concept testing on the Changi Airport Line before carrying out engineering tests during off-service hours, and progressing to testing with passenger service from 11 pm onwards. When all these tests were successful, we moved on to full day service on Sundays, progressively increasing the number of trains until we ran a timetable on Sundays that is identical to weekdays with morning and evening peak hour patterns. Along the way, we systematically logged down and investigated every issue that we encountered. For each issue, we develop short term mitigation measures and operational workarounds so as to minimise impact to commuters. We also work out permanent solutions, such as software enhancements, with Thales engineers. Unfortunately, all these may not be obvious to commuters because a delay is a delay and commuters would not be able to distinguish a new category of faults from others that have been mitigated the day before. Later, Alvin Kek, who heads the NSEWL Rail Operations, will share with you some of these issues and explain how we have addressed them. While it may not seem like it, our data shows that delays due to teething problems relating to the new signalling system have reduced over past weeks and we are looking forward to software enhancements that we will be implementing tonight.

Working as a team

Last but not least, teamwork. Staff from LTA, SMRT and Thales have been working closely to deliver the new signalling system on both NSL and TWE over the past few months. We have joint meetings and task forces at all levels. During traffic hours, SMRT operations controllers in the Operations Control Centre (OCC) are supplemented by signalling engineers from LTA, SMRT and Thales so that we can quickly react to incidents caused by the new signalling system. Alvin (SVP, Rail Ops, SMRT) chairs a daily meeting involving staff from all three organisations to review new issues in the preceding 24 hours and plan for the activities ahead. Hoon Ping (LTA Chief Executive) and I co-chair weekly meetings with Thales management to make sure that we have the necessary resources to make good progress in this project. There is also a LTA-SMRT joint board committee to look into safety and service reliability issues relating to the new signalling system. As a team, we are sparing no efforts to stabilise the launch of the new signalling system on NSL and TWE so as to minimise inconvenience to commuters.

Conclusion

To conclude, on behalf of SMRT, I apologise for the inconvenience to commuters over the past weeks. SMRT is committed to serving our commuters. As a nation, this is the first time that we are implementing a re-signalling project on an existing line. We will make sure that the lessons learnt from the North-South Line are ported over to the East-West Line. The completion of the NSEWL re-signalling project will bring long-term benefits to our commuters. These include more reliable train services and an increase in train capacity, translating into shorter waiting time and less platform congestion during peak hours. I would like to assure commuters and the public that as a team, LTA, SMRT and Thales are sparing no effort, working hand-in-hand to iron out teething issues with the new signalling system.

Thank you.

Fine-tuning the New Signalling System

Since we began regular system-level performance checks on the new signalling system for the North-South Line, we have received valuable feedback and suggestions from many individuals and organisations. I thought it would be useful to share with commuters the intricacies of implementing a new signalling system on an existing line.

Greenfield projects in railway engineering refer to those conducted on completely new lines, e.g. the Downtown Line, while brownfield projects are those executed on existing systems, e.g. the North-South and East-West Lines (NSEWL). New enhancements in a brownfield project would have to integrate seamlessly into a ‘live’ system.

A greenfield signalling project typically takes a few months of intensive daily testing involving thousands of hours. For a brownfield project, if we were to restrict the performance checks to only weekends, or engineering hours (i.e. 1.30AM – 4.30AM), it would take Singapore years to implement the new signalling system on the NSEWL. This is why we have no choice but to conduct checks throughout the day, including weekday peak hours, when trains are running at high frequencies with heavy commuter loads. In addition, we have about two million passenger trips on the NSEWL every day. It would not be prudent to shut down the lines for extended hours to conduct the performance checks.

My team is now ironing out teething issues with the new signalling system. Every time we encounter a problem, we systematically log and investigate the issue. We then work with the Land Transport Authority (LTA) and system supplier Thales to come up with hardware and software fixes to rectify the issues. When we began weekday checks, we encountered a number of software related issues that affected train services. After joint investigations with LTA and Thales, we managed to identify the root causes and developed operational workarounds while waiting for software fixes to be implemented by Thales.

Some – including my own friends – have asked why the re-signalling project takes so long. “Surely SMRT cannot be the first operator in the world to change signalling systems,” they exclaimed. A former classmate told me that one of her friends is now an engineering professor, and offered to have him advise us on this project. I had to clarify that this is unlike the Circle Line incident in 2016 when we dealt with unknown unknowns. We are adopting a planned, systematic approach to identify and rectify the issues in our signalling trials.

Each software update is thoroughly tested in the laboratory. It is also tested on the tracks during engineering hours, before being applied during passenger service hours. These fixes take weeks to be delivered. We are planning a software patch in the coming weeks. We hope for a smooth implementation.

The procedure is tedious, because no two railway systems are identical in the way they are designed and operated. The system hardware and software we have are customised for the unique local environment. While the system supplier had experience working with other operators in the world, they are unable to simply replicate the well-oiled systems of Taipei, Hong Kong and London, and import those here.

Safety is of paramount importance. The signalling system is like the brain that commands and controls trains on the network. We will fine-tune the signalling system and ensure that it can accurately track the exact position, speed and braking distance of all trains on the network. It will take us some time, but we are not taking any chances as far as safety is concerned.

My team and I have learned a lot from Singapore’s very first re-signalling project. We are keenly aware of commuter feedback and inconvenience due to the ongoing performance checks. I would like to assure commuters that we are working hard to get over with this phase of system renewal on the NSEWL. We remain committed to completing the performance checks as soon as we can, and to fulfil our promise of providing commuters with better journeys. Thank you for the patience and understanding.

Lee Ling Wee
Chief Executive Officer, SMRT Trains

Re-signalling Update: Your Questions Answered Here

Last month, we answered 7 commonly asked questions about SMRT Trains’ new signalling system.
As system-level performance checks on the new signalling system for the North-South Line (NSL) continue, we seek to regularly answer the questions you have on re-signalling.

 

1. Compared to the Circle Line (CCL) and the Downtown Line (DTL), why is it so challenging to run re-signalling checks on the NSL?

The signalling systems on the CCL and the DTL were implemented before the lines commenced passenger service. Each line has one type of train, which was easier. On the other hand, the NSL currently has four different fleets of trains. Each fleet has its characteristics, and every train is unique.
Moreover, the newer lines run completely underground so they are not subject to inclement weather conditions. In contrast, our NSL operates on both open viaducts and tracks underground.
All these factors add to the complexities of our re-signalling project.

2. Has there been any progress after a month of system-level performance checks?

Yes, we have rectified several teething issues including the following:
• Improved alignment of train doors and platform screen doors at stations;
• Better regulation of train service intervals and train dwell time at stations;
• Significantly reducing incidents of train overshoot at platforms; and
• Smoother train braking and acceleration along the viaduct during adverse weather conditions.

3. The Tuas West Extension (TWE) was launched on 18 June 2017. Why was there a disruption on 28 June 2017, just ten days later?

Unlike the main stretch of the East-West Line (EWL) which is still running on the legacy Westinghouse system installed since 1987, the newly-completed TWE operates on the new signalling system.
This explains why trains moving to and from the TWE will have to pause at Pioneer MRT Station for a few minutes each time to switch signalling systems. On the evening of 28 June, the radio communication network of the new signalling system failed and affected the NSL and TWE.

 


4. How long more will the re-signalling checks on the NSL last?

In a briefing last month (May 2017), LTA shared that a complex system like the new system would take about four to six months to stabilise from the time it is rolled out on a regular basis (29 May 2017). We are not alone in this. Our fellow operators in London and Hong Kong faced similar issues when they renewed their old signalling systems. They also took a while to rectify the issues.

The Future of Rail

Harnessing the best available technologies and working with forward-thinking research institutions is helping SMRT Trains put more early-warning systems in place and build a rail network that is future-ready.

It is not unlike the perfectly-timed choreography of a Formula One pit stop team.

Four men from the Emergency Response Unit (ERU) stand trackside on SMRT’s East-West Line (EWL), tool kits in hand. The train passes and they kick into gear, once the Operations Control Centre switches off power. As part of the safety protocols, they confirm that the power rail is no longer “live” and protection measures are in place, before accessing the track to verify that power is off by using voltage testers. They then perform quick rectification work on a loose bolt that secures the claw, which supports the power rail.

ERU has a window of five minutes to get the system back on track, before the next train rounds the corner, explained Mr Lee Keen Sing, Director, Permanent Way Engineering and Planning, SMRT Trains. A radio check is conducted, and constant communication is maintained with all involved. Power to the track is restored in time for the next train to arrive on schedule – only after all personnel and equipment are cleared from the track.

Minutes earlier, a train-mounted sensor had alerted an on-board computer that the power rail – which supplies electricity to trains – had shifted out of position. It had simultaneously triggered SMS alerts to SMRT Trains’ 24/7 Maintenance Operations Centre (MOC) at Bishan Depot, and the ERU. A visual check showed that the problem could not wait till the trains stop running at 1am, prompting immediate action.

The sensors, in use since 2014, have become vital to the smooth running of critical systems. Trains draw power from the power rail through train-mounted current collector device (CCD) shoes. If the power rail sags below an acceptable limit, it could trigger a power disruption.

The sensors, which sit in tandem with the CCD shoes, measure the dynamic readings and ensure that the data, with variations as small as 1mm, are within the safety thresholds. The MOC is alerted to potential power rail defects.

Condition monitoring systems are a critical part of the whole machinery designed to pick up on potential defects and kick into gear before they even happen. This is critical to the smooth running of SMRT’s trains, explained Mr Lee, who used to oversee the division in charge of technology, project and system management, including the acquisition of new technology. SMRT Trains constantly reviews areas for improvement where technology can be inserted to provide leading indicators for early mitigation of potential issues, thus increasing the availability and reliability of our systems.

Data-driven Support

These mechanical sensors in use – the linear variable differential transducers (LVDT) – were developed in-house by SMRT Corporation to monitor the condition of the power rail during service hours. The LVDTs are currently mounted on five trains on the North-South and East-West Lines (NSEWL). In 2016, about half of all SMS alerts that were triggered prompted immediate rectification work.

All data collected weekly is plotted against data from previous weeks, allowing SMRT Trains to identify power rail segments for earlier preventive maintenance. This reduces the likelihood of corrective maintenance.

“We always do preventive maintenance, but during our weekly “sense-making” session, we also check that the power rail is within its maintenance limit, identify stretches that is degrading faster than normal and bring forward preventive maintenance along those stretches,” Mr Lee explained.

These sensors supplement a yellow locomotive called the multifunctional vehicle (MFV) that circulates the entire track during engineering hours between 1am and 4am, collecting information on 16 parameters relating to the track and the power rail. It takes about four to six months to cover the entire NSEWL with a single MFV.

The Aim for ‘Gold’

Using the latest available technology, including sensors and analytics, is a major part of the strategy to build a future-proof rail system, even as SMRT Trains works to replace and upgrade large stretches of the 30-year-old network.

“We need to move away from just correcting problems and towards being able to predict when such problems might happen. We have to fix or replace things even before they break, because if they do, the cost (to us and to our commuters) is much higher,” Mr Lee explained.

“What adds to the challenge is that in the last 30 years, ridership on the network has increased tremendously. Train frequencies have gone up as well. It means the old maintenance rulebooks for existing hardware can be thrown out the window. New ways of assessing risk are needed,” he said.

This is especially important as the gauntlet has been thrown down for Singapore to achieve the ‘gold standard’ in rail reliability.

In the rail industry, we talk about ‘Mean Kilometres before Failure’ (MKBF), which measures delays of more than five minutes. The MKBF for the NSL improved from 156,000 train-km in 2016 to 291,000 train-km in the first quarter of 2017, while the EWL improved from 145,000 train-km in 2016 to 215,000 train-km in 1Q2017. The Circle Line (CCL) also improved 228,000 train-km in 2016 to 452,000 train-km in 1Q2017. The target is to achieve 300,000 train-km by the end of 2017. The challenge was laid down by Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan for Singapore to achieve 400,000 train-km by 2018.

It will involve putting in place systems and processes that will allow SMRT Trains to predict potential failures in a more accurate and timely way, Mr Lee said. This could include condition monitoring of critical assets and equipment, predictive maintenance and a tighter integration of data collection devices with analytical tools.

“We think that it is important for the company to make these strategic investments even though it will probably take a few years to acquire the new capabilities,” explains Mr Lee Ling Wee, Chief Executive Officer, SMRT Trains.

Thinking Ahead

SMRT Corporation has been working with research institutes and academics to develop analytical engineering tools to predict future failures. It is working with the Hong Kong Polytechnic University to develop a sensor system similar to the one currently in use by the Hong Kong MTR. These sensors watch for anomalous vibrations as proxies to track and train conditions, so that emerging issues can be rectified early, before they cause problems.

When the system for Singapore is completed next year, these new sensors, placed along two to four sectors of the track and on two trains, will provide a running health check of the system. They will be able to pick up on up to six parameters, including if and how much the rail has been worn down, and if there are cracks or chips on the track. On trains, details like the level of suspension or the condition of the wheels can be monitored, which can affect how comfortable a ride is.

The SMRT-NTU Corporate Lab, a collaboration with the Nanyang Technological University, is co-funded by the National Research Foundation. The five-year, $60-million programme will look at how rail systems can be maintained more cost effectively. SMRT Corporation has also signed a five-year master research collaboration agreement with national research institute A*STAR to develop sensors that will allow for better early warning systems, as well as a memorandum of understanding with the University of Birmingham to enhance rail reliability. It is also looking into technologies to better monitor other subsystems on the train, including doors, air-conditioners and brakes.

“Knowing what’s in best shape and where weaknesses lie, could allow SMRT Trains to, for example, send out its best-conditioned trains during peak hours, further reducing chances of a delay or breakdown,” said Mr Lee Keen Sing. Ultimately, it means having a rail network that is more resilient, and one that gets commuters to where they need to go, he added.

“Currently, we only measure critical systems, but we are working to move to a stage where we can measure everything, and better optimise our resources while ensuring fewer delays and disruptions for commuters in the long run.

“With empirical data and data points, the more you know, the more you can minimise ‘unknown unknowns’.”

7 Questions about SMRT Trains’ New Signalling System

Weekday system-level performance checks on the new signalling system for North-South Line (NSL) commenced on 29 May 2017. As the new signalling system is fine-tuned by engineers, commuters may expect teething issues from the new system while aboard NSL trains between Marina South Pier and Jurong East. This guide explains some of the situations you may encounter on the NSL during the signalling checks.

1. Why is SMRT Trains changing to a new signalling system? What are the benefits to commuters?
The new signalling system will be more efficient than the current system, which has been in use since 1987. We will be able to safely reduce the distance between trains travelling on the network, and further increase the number of trains. This means shorter waiting times for commuters.

2. Why does the train stop between stations?
For safety reasons, all trains are programmed to maintain a distance between one another. Trains will not proceed if there is another train up ahead.

3. Why did the train overshoot the platform and have to reverse?
The new signalling system comes with various pre-set programmes to run and stop trains at various speeds. These pre-set programmes are being fine-tuned to suit different weather conditions. For example, the braking distance for a train arriving at Ang Mo Kio MRT Station (aboveground) on a clear day, would differ from that required during a thunderstorm. Wet tracks would require a longer distance for trains to come to a stop.

Trains may therefore not align correctly at station platforms. It is important to note that passengers will remain safe, as all trains are programmed to maintain a safety distance between one another. Trains will not proceed if there is another train up ahead. If the alignment is incorrect, trains will reverse for passengers to board and alight. In the rare event that the misalignment is more than 15 metres, trains proceed to the next station as programmed.

4. Why do the doors close so fast?
As we work towards the target of having more trains, and shorter waiting times for commuters, trains will have to stop for fixed intervals at stations. The new signalling system will also open and close doors automatically. The dwell time (i.e. the duration of trains stopping at station platforms) remains the same. Doors continue to remain open for about 30 seconds at most stations.

Please do not rush to board the trains. Please look out for light indicators and audio chimes, which indicate that train doors are closing. Train doors will close automatically soon after the lights flash and door chimes go off.

5. Why did my train brake suddenly?
Signalling systems are used to direct railway traffic. Trains move when the system indicates so, and stop when they receive a signal from the system. Signalling systems are built with safety as the top priority. Emergency brakes are applied when trains receive incorrect or conflicting signals, do not receive any signals momentarily, or when there are trains ahead. The signalling system is then reset, to ensure trains only move according to assigned signals.

6. Why are the performance checks carried out during peak hours? Can’t the checks be done during off-peak hours?
Trains fitted with the new signalling system have been put through rigorous checks before they were cleared for passenger service. Earlier trials took place during the last hour of passenger service, and progressed to whole of Sundays. Unlike new MRT lines where intensive testing can be conducted with a single type of train before passenger service commences, we are testing the new signalling system on an existing line with various train fleets. As there are limited engineering hours each day (from 1.30am to 4.30am), it is not possible for us to accumulate adequate testing hours if we do not run the new signalling system during weekdays. The June school holidays present the best opportunity for us to do so. We have to conduct all-day performance checks to work out teething issues that may arise when a new signalling system is introduced to a train network. The system-level performance checks on weekdays will allow us to further intensify tests of the new signalling system’s reliability. Our engineers will continue to monitor the system’s response to different situations, and trains services’ adherence to their schedules.

7. There were delays on 1 & 2 June 2017. What happened?
The first incident at 6.20pm on 1 June 2017 was due to a glitch in the computer server used to manage train schedules. This unfortunately caused all trains on NSL to halt. Although the back-up server kicked in quickly, operations controllers needed 30 minutes to manually reassign train schedules.

On 2 June 2017, a signalling equipment known as the Movement Authority Unit (MAU) registered a fault at around 4.48pm. The MAU fault resulted in slower train movement between Kranji and Admiralty stations. Signalling trials are part and parcel of new signalling systems and carried out to help train operators identify and resolve teething problems that may occur. As we continue to intensify the testing of the new signalling system and until the system stabilises, there may potentially be more disruptions. We seek the understanding of commuters.

Minister Khaw Boon Wan at Kim Chuan Depot

SMRT Trains welcomed Coordinating Minister for Infrastructure and Minister for Transport Khaw Boon Wan to Kim Chuan Depot last Friday (26 May 2017) as we marked 200 disruption-free days on the Circle Line. Minister Khaw said that our colleagues “are working hard to raise rail reliability” and are “pressing on to improve it further”. We thank the Minister for his encouragement.

New signalling system for North-South Line to commence on 29 May

From next week (week commencing 29 May 2017), system-level performance checks on the new signalling system for the North-South Line (NSL) will be carried out on weekdays. The intensive weekday runs follow the Sunday checks done since 16 April 2017, and will allow SMRT and the Land Transport Authority (LTA) to carry out continuous checks on the new signalling system.

 

Engineers from SMRT, LTA and Thales, the supplier of the signalling system, have been monitoring the performance of the signalling system closely since NSL trains began serving passengers using the new signalling system in late March. Engineers continue to rectify teething issues. These include achieving higher accuracy of train and station door alignment, better coordination between closure of train and station doors, familiarising train captains with operating the new system in inclement weather and allowing maintenance teams to troubleshoot and rectify faults with the new system.

The weekday system-level performance checks will allow the system engineers to further fine-tune and improve the operational performance of the system. These checks on the NSL – Singapore’s oldest MRT line – will furnish engineers and maintenance staff with data on the performance of the new signalling system, with the number of trains deployed on the NSL and the interval between each train varying from peak and non-peak hours. Such data will be assessed closely as part of rigorous checks before the system is declared fully capable of eventually supporting train operations at intervals of as short as 100 seconds between each train.

During the weekday system checks, the new signalling system may continue to encounter some glitches as it settles in to full-load operations. Commuters on the NSL could experience instances of train and platform doors not opening or closing promptly, trains held at stations slightly longer than usual, or trains stopping momentarily between stations. In earlier trials which took place during the last hour of passenger service, and during Sunday trials, the safety system stopped trains momentarily so that engineering staff could address signal glitches. The new Communications-Based Train Control signalling system is designed with this safety feature which ensures trains will be kept at a proper distance from one another at all times. Such situations are not safety critical and SMRT, LTA and Thales will have more engineers on standby to respond quickly to situations that may arise. More station staff will also be on hand to assist commuters.

These weekday system checks have been planned to commence during the June holidays to minimise commuter inconvenience. However, those travelling on the NSL are still advised to cater for additional travelling time.

Mr Alvin Kek, SMRT Senior Vice President for Rail Operations (NSEWL), said: “While we look forward to operating trains on the new signalling system, the all-day performance checks are part and parcel of working out teething issues that may arise when a new signalling system is introduced to a train network. Our engineers, operations controllers, and trains and stations operations staff have been working with LTA and Thales for the past two months to ensure that the checks on the new signalling system are carried out under close monitoring, and to ensure that all incidents are quickly resolved. We continue to ask for commuters’ patience and cooperation as we work round the clock to settle the system in as quickly as possible.”

Commuters can refer to SMRT’s Facebook and Twitter feed, as well as the SMRT Connect and MyTransport travel apps for service updates.

SMRT and University of Birmingham Work to Enhance Rail Reliability

SMRT Corporation and the University of Birmingham, one of the top universities for railway science and education in the United Kingdom, have embarked on four research projects that will enhance the reliability of railway networks.

About 20 SMRT engineers will be involved in research carried out at the University’s state-of-the-art railway laboratories. When necessary, SMRT equipment and engineering staff will be sent to the UK or vice versa depending on the nature of the projects.

The projects are guided by a Master Research & Collaboration Agreement signed between the University of Birmingham and SMRT Corporation promoting joint research into railway engineering by both signatories. Under the agreement, researchers from the University and SMRT Trains will look into projects to improve the reliability of rail infrastructure and power systems.

Commenting on the joint research effort, Mr Ng Bor Kiat, Chief Technology Officer, SMRT Corporation, said: “We are delighted to partner the University of Birmingham once again to deepen and broaden expertise in railway engineering. These research projects complement the effort by SMRT Trains to work towards a reliability-centric maintenance approach. This will benefit commuters as engineering staff can intervene proactively to fix faults before they occur.

“At the heart of this effort is the increased use of condition monitoring devices, simulation tools and data analytics, which are among the research areas spearheaded by the UoB-SMRT research agreement. The pairing of academic know-how with the experience gained by heavy rail engineers is a valuable combination that will lead to better reliability, availability and safety. In short, a better journey for rail commuters.”

Professor Clive Roberts, Director of the Birmingham Centre for Railway Research and Education, said: “We are delighted to be commencing four interesting research projects with SMRT, which will enable us to demonstrate the benefits of our research on a live network. Three of the projects will focus of condition monitoring of different railway assets, and will take forward research that has been previously developed in the laboratory. The fourth project will provide a detailed understanding of the dynamic loads on the railway power system.”

In October 2016, SMRT Corporation and the University of Birmingham jointly announced the launch a post graduate course in railway engineering. The three-year course is the first of its kind for engineers here. It is jointly administered by the SMRT Institute, which serves as the academic centre for SMRT Corporation, and the University’s Birmingham Centre for Railway Research and Education (BCRRE), whose railway education programmes attract staff from leading metro operators such as the London Underground and the Taipei Metro.

The course is unique because it provides course participants with perspectives from an institute of higher learning for railway education as well as real-world operator experience. The intellectual framework provided by the University of Birmingham, when strengthened with lessons learned by SMRT Trains in the course of running heavy and light rail systems, will contribute to accelerating the development of our rapidly growing railway engineering workforce. This is achieved by providing a strong academic foundation for course participants, tempered by knowledge of how classroom concepts are applied in real-world situations.

Isaac’s very own Train City

At the age of six, Isaac Nathaniel D’Souza was presented with a SMRT train model by one of our colleagues. His fascination with trains grew exponentially, and he is now the proud architect of his very own SMRT Land – an intricately-built miniature city of electrical train models – right in his home.


A true blue train fanatic, Isaac is a Service Ambassador at Jurong East Station. In his quest to build the city, he spent a whooping five-digit figure to remodel his room and purchase materials for details such as the roundel replica and train livery on his walls. Isaac is inspired by his visits to different parts of Japan, where most of his electrical train models come from